How Forclosures are Affecting the Rental Market – Stop Foreclosure Fast

As more and more foreclosures are being seen in the marketplace, more and more coverage is being spent on the homeowners losing their homes. However, the analysis on the impact of foreclosures shouldnt stop with the homeowners. Foreclosures have long term effects both financial and culturally. As more and more people are losing their homes, fewer individuals are able to leave their rental apartments to invest in a home of their own.

What happens to the rental market when it is saturated with former homeowners who have lost their houses to foreclosure becuase they can not sell thier house, as well as individuals who are too timid to step out to purchase their new home. And the worst case scenario of all, what happens to renters whose landlords miscalculate and lose their property and the renters lose a place to call home.

The rise in foreclosures hasnt been beneficial for renters. Although initially, it might seem as though renters have a safe enclave from the perils of foreclosure, many renters are stuck right in the middle of the dilemma. More and more individuals, couples and families have to compete for affordable, low cost rental space as a result of the foreclosure increase.

In addition, when the property they are renting from becomes a foreclosure, the individual, couple or family finds themselves suddenly homeless through no fault of their own. The emotional impact of this sudden loss of home can be tremendous. Nearly 20 percent of all foreclosure homes are investor owned rental properties. That means that one in four foreclosures involves renters who are immediately forced to move. Many of these foreclosed rental properties are occurring in low income and minority communities, influencing neighborhoods that are already dealing with economically vulnerable individuals and families.

The number of renters has increased drastically over the last year. Renters are up by nearly 1 million, which is more than four times more than the growth rate between 2003 and 2006. The demand for affordable, low cost housing has significantly increased, but the supply of these low rent homes is decreasing.

Currently, studies are showing that nearly half of all rental families are contributing 30 percent of their income to their housing, while one in every four families were putting 50 percent or more of their income towards their rent and associated costs. The economic impact of these families spending the majority of their incomes on rent cannot be underestimated. If these families were living in low cost, more affordable housing, the stability and overall economic stimulus would improve.

However, the renting landscape is not thoroughly grim. Due to a weak housing sales market, more and more homes, condos and units are being put on the market as rental properties instead of sales. While the debate still exists as to whether these rental properties offer the low cost housing options that are needed on the market, the availability of more and more rental properties assumes that the situation will be alleviated to a degree. No matter what, however, the foreclosure increase is showing an impact for renters as well as homeowners alike.

If you are an investor and own a home that you are going to loose to foreclosure you have options. There are ways you can stop foreclosure fast and save the little equity you have in your investment. To sell your house and receive a free offer for your investment property, contact your local home buyer. They exist in every major metro area and you can sell your house fast.

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