$1.7 Billion of Tax Payers Money to Stop Foreclosure Crisis

June 9, 2008

Currently, there is a bill in Congress that could change the financial futures of 500,000 homeowners. For these individuals who are facing foreclosure, the bill could have significant influence. Since the bill has already passed in the House, chances are good that the bill could go into effect, helping the financial situation of half a million homeowners facing a potential foreclosure.

The bill would allow borrowers who were struggling with their monthly mortgage bills to refinance easily. They would be able to see more affordable and more financially stable mortgage choices through the use of federal aid. They would get a mortgage that was federally guaranteed by the government.

This bill has been created to help only homeowners avoid foreclosure. If an individual is an investor or speculator, they are not eligible for help with this home financial situation. Specifically, this bill is set to help the homeowners who are doing their best to cover their mortgage payments, but falling short due to unrealistic settings, not the speculators who are trying to make more money in the real estate market.

There is a catch to the federal bill, however. If the homeowner takes advantage of the effort and aid given by the government, the homeowner will have to split any future home profits on the sale of the home in half with the government. For those homeowners who do not plan to move from the home for quite some time, this is less of an issue than for those homeowners who plan to move from the home in 3 to 5 years. Cutting the profits from the sale of the home in half can have a significant impact on the homeowners profit margins, especially since most individuals see the majority of their equity in the home they own.

There are arguments from taxpayers as well, and for good reason. The bill will cost taxpayers 1.7 billion dollars, according to the Congressional Budget Office. Although the price seems high, it could have been worse when you analyze the impact of increased foreclosures in the country. However, many taxpayers are arguing that we are having to pay for the mistakes of these individuals who took a mortgage when they were not eligible and the taxpayers are paying for the mess now. In essence, the taxpayers argue, they will be paying for the greed of the financial institutions whose unrealistic mortgages and subprime interest rates attracted the wrong individuals to purchase a home.

However, foreclosures can have a tremendously negative impact on the economy and the overall quality of life in an economy with higher foreclosures will drop significantly. Rising foreclosures erase future profits in nearby properties and in the economy overall. This bill has been created to avoid the big picture fallout that occurs when more and more foreclosures happen in the real estate market. The sacrifice is the taxpayer dollars to help alleviate whatever economic crisis would have evolved from the higher number of foreclosures. Something needs to be done to prevent more foreclosures and this bill is the band aid that is thought to alleviate and reverse the trend in foreclosures.

So the Question is, as a tax payer do you agree that we have some responsibility to help out the over 500,000 home owners who are facing foreclosure and saying, how can I sell my house fast? Are you comfortable with our tax dollars helping stop the foreclosure crisis?

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Will Lenders Pay for the Mortage Crisis?

May 18, 2008

If your community has been largely affected by the foreclosure rates around your home, you might be wondering how this could have happened and who will be held responsible for our real estate market mess. After all, someone must have foreseen the mortgage issues headed towards many of these former hot real estate markets. Why was nothing done sooner to prevent the huge losses?

In fact, many real estate market experts have been vocal about the negative impact of the mortgage loans. However, despite warnings, many novice homeowners or uneducated buyers have found themselves in financial quagmires that are impossible to solve. As foreclosures are rising and our economy slows, lawmakers are turning their attention towards the mortgage lenders who originally propped up the cards to watch it all fall down.

Specifically, a Senate subcommittee has been formed to investigate the possibility that mortgage lenders abused the bankruptcy code to file loans for individuals who would not have qualified for the money previously. By misusing the bankruptcy system, mortgage lenders and companies were able to impose high fees whose legality is questionable. In addition, these high fees and misuse of the bankruptcy system directly played into the foreclosure problems that many homeowners are currently facing.

In essence, the Senate subcommittee is looking into whether mortgage lenders and companies intentionally played towards people who were too ignorant or overwhelmed to truly understand what financial situation they were getting into. By concentrating too highly on the property, but underplaying the fine print in the mortgage loan, these institutions were blatantly acting fraudulently and requesting too much money from individuals who simply did not have it. Although the mortgage lenders were aware that they were placing a nearly-impossible financial situation on these homeowners, they are accused of not exercising ethic restraint by giving out these loans.

The Senate subcommittee will look into not only past actions by these mortgage lenders and institutions for penalties, but also increase the level of penalties given to those lenders who manipulate the bankruptcy law for their own financial gain – and consequent ruin of other investors.

Originally, bankruptcy laws were initiated to give homeowners with financial issues the chance to keep their homes. However, with the questionably high fees demanded by these mortgage lenders and institutions, the ability to pay off the home was impossible, despite the bankruptcy protection clause. For this reason, more and more people were permanently removed from their homes while certain mortgage lenders and institutions pocketed the money.

One reason for the subcommittee investigation comes on the heels of a sharp increase in foreclosure filings. With an increase of 112 percent since last year, lawmakers are concerned that the problem will grow even worse as many mortgages will be reset and increased this year, causing numerous people who are just barely hanging on to lose control completely. With these extra fees putting the homeowner in a worse position and having them fall even more behind, the mortgage institutions are under direct scrutiny over the legality of these fees and their execution.


Where the Real Estate Market is Currently Growing

May 15, 2008

Read an article on the real estate market lately and you will find little more than tales of gloom and doom. Recession impact, the falling dollar, real estate bubbles bursting the hot markets – the combination of all these factors are the culmination of real estate gurus warning of an inflated real estate market for years now. These fears and vocal warnings have impaired the real estate market, stifling housing sales and highlighting foreclosure problems for banks in communities nationwide.

However, despite the bad tales of the real estate market that abound in the news, there are plenty of areas that are growing, improving and seeing positive changes in their housing sector. Although much of the nation will be either stagnant or continuing to show a decline, these regions are growing, boosted by local economic factors that are shielding the community from a housing bubble catastrophe and giving local investors in these areas something to smile about.

Take McAllen, Texas for example. With a 12 month forecast of 4 percent increase, this area of the country is sitting on strong real estate possibilities. The five year price change for McAllen has been a steady 23.3 percent, giving this region a slow but steady outlook on their housing market. This Texas region might see the strongest positive return for their housing market, but there are other states that will have multiple cities with positive growth predicted in the next 12 months.

Rochester, New York is already a popular place for families, but with real estate prices seeing a strong 2.7 percent increase in the next year, Rochester is looking even more financially fantastic. With a 20.1 percent rate of increase over the last five years and an admirable 5 percent change in the foreclosure rate, Rochesters real estate market is looking ideal to many investors and families alike. New York in general seems to be avoiding the real estate crunch as cities like Buffalo and Syracuse are also predicted to see steady 2.4 percent and 2.6 percent increases respectfully in the area.

New Orleans has been predicted to make a strong step forward this year with a 2.2 percent increase in the real estate market. With a 49 percent rate of foreclosure change, it seems this personable city has found its feet after hardship and will start its inevitable climb to being an enviable place to own a home again. Nearby Baton Rouge has also enjoyed a 1.9 percent housing increase predicted. Combined with their lower 14 percent rate of foreclosure change, Baton Rouge and New Orleans combine to make Louisiana a preferred housing market.

With 75 of the top 100 U.S. cities expected to see falling real estate prices in the next year, these housing areas are anomalies. With record foreclosure numbers and plummeting prices, the fastest growing real estate markets are nothing to sneeze at. Many real estate experts are predicting the full impact of the real estate bubble burst will not be finished until 2010. Areas like California and Nevada are clinging to their homes, but if you happen to live in McAllen, Texas and other hot markets, rejoice. Your homes are steady throughout the real estate crisis.

© ExpertHomeOffers.com 2008


How Inflation and the Dollar are Hurting Your Chances to Sell Your House

May 14, 2008

Paying a mortgage bill is one of the largest monthly bills the average family faces. When the economy dips into a recession, the mortgage payment can seem increasingly daunting. Our current economic situation couples the recession with increasing gas prices and a falling dollar. What does this mean for your mortgage interest rate, your monthly payments and your house value?

Currently, Fannie Mae is allowing some homeowners to refinance their house if they owe more than what their house is actually worth. How could they have gotten into this situation? The answer is interest rates and the decrease in the value of houses. If the interest rate on the mortgage was variable or subprime, the interest rate and consequent mortgage payments can jump vastly higher than what the actual value of the house is worth. Also in almost all major cities across the nation home prices have dropped, meaning now homes have mortgages that are higher than the value of the house. This move by Fannie Mae is significant because in essence, it means that Fannie Mae is willing to take some loss on the current mortgage loan situation for some homeowners rather than let them default and lose their home entirely.

This move by Fannie Mae may help people in many areas in the nation. Cities like Las Vegas, Stockton California, Detroit Michiga, Boise Idaho and others have seen a dramatic decrease in home prices. The bad news is not all home owners will quialify for the refinance help. In order to qualify you have to meet standerds like good credit, have an certain type of existing mortgage and that mortgage had to be put in place at a certain time.

Homeowners and new home builders are in a pinch. Census data seems to have underestimated the number of new homes that have not been sold and foreclosure rates are steadily climbing. In addition, the inflation rate is growing. This pinch on the everyday homeowner can be significant, causing some homes to question whether they can survive during this treacherous time to keep their home through this recession. With the falling dollar in the market, investors are pulling funds from national banks and putting their money abroad, causing national banks and investments to feel the pinch as well. Mortgage rates are unlikely to spike any time soon, but even a small increase could spell bad news for those homeowners just holding on to making their payments on time and avoiding foreclosures.

What else could possibly affect our mortgage interest rates and the housing market overall? The weak labor market plays a large role in the housing market. The economy is in a virtual hiring freeze, while some companies have already started laying off workers. Job loss has always precipitated trouble in the housing market. In addition, overall job loss in the community makes workers and homeowners scared, limiting the housing sales. Any time the general feeling is to hold onto the house you have instead of try to sell it or take on a larger mortgage payment, we are experiencing a weaker housing market. As employers and workers feel more confident about their employment possibilities, the housing market will improve as well.

Interest rates will be dictated by the Federal Government. In early May 2008, the Fed cut the interest rate, which pushed the 10-year treasury rate up. The 30-year mortgage rate follows the treasury rate, so an increase in the payments due would have accompanied this move in the financial sector. In general, homeowners and workers are trying to maintain what they have instead of pushing to take on something new and stagnant movement like this can spell trouble for mortgage rates.

If you are in a financial situation and thinking how can I sell my house fast, then contact your local home buyer. Every major metropolitan area has professional home buyers that help solve home seller problems. They help people avoid foreclosure, with short sales, sell because of divorce, cash out of investment properties, or sell if you have no equity. So contact your local home buyer and receive a free offer for your house, you have nothing to lose.


Home Inventory Continues to Climb – How Can You Sell Your House?

May 9, 2008

A recent survey conducted by a California based real estate company reported a 1.3 percent increase in housing inventory. These are houses that are for sale on the multiple listing service or MLS through the month of April 2008. The survey was conducted on 29 major metropolitan areas across the United States.

The results of the survey show a continued supply of houses for sale on the market in most major metro areas. This increase in housing inventory will further depress home prices. After all, the supply for homes has definitely not increased.

The major cities who saw and increase in the number of houses for sale hit the market were Austin Texas at 7.1 percent, Chicago Illinois with 5.9 percent, Boston Massachusetts with 5.6 percent and Philadelphia with 5.4 percent increase.

Interestingly enough Las Vegas, currently the capital of the foreclosure crisis saw a decrease in the number of homes on the market. This in contributed to many banks accepting shorts sales and selling homes on their books they receive from foreclosure. It is also contributed to the fact that Las Vegas has one of the fastest drop in home prices in the nation.

If you own a home in Las Vegas this news is like a double edge sward. You now may have a better chance of selling your house but you obviously will be selling for much less. In some cases 25 to 30 percent less than you could have sold last year. The good news is the news of a decreased number of houses for sale in your area could be a start of a real estate bottom.

Another interesting fact is the number of home owners who have dropped the sale price on their home. Of the 29 metro cities where the survey was conducted, Orange County California tops the number of homes who had a reduced sale price last month with over 49 percent of the homes dropping price. Other areas that top the home price reduction survey are Las Vegas Nevada, Jacksonville Florida, Bakersfield California, Las Angeles California, Miami Florida, Washington D.C. and Sacramento California.

If you do need to sell your house quickly I suggest you get in touch with a local real estate investor who knows your local market and can buy your house quickly. ExpertHomeOffers.com is a company who connects home sellers with professional home buyers. They have a very large network of real estate investors who are always purchasing homes and increasing their real estate portfolio. 


Foreclosures Up 23 Percent – Sell My House

May 2, 2008

The 2008 first quarter results are in and they do not look good. Foreclosures are up 23 percent from the first quarter in 2007. This marks record foreclosures across the nation. Now one in every 195 house holds is in some sate of foreclosure.

We are only four months into the year and already over 156,000 home owners have lost their homes to foreclosure. The real scary thing is that the foreclosure rate is not slowing down, it is actually speeding up. This means we will see more foreclosures each and every month. There were only 4 states in the nation that did not have increasing rates of foreclosure.

So where are the hardest hit areas? Nevada, California, Florida, and Arizona top the list with the largest amount of foreclosures and the trend does not look to be slowing anytime soon. One out of every 54 homes in Nevada is in a sate of foreclosure. This is amazing considering they are still one of the fastest growing cities in the nation. Many people moving to Las Vegas and other areas of Nevada are renting until they see the market bottom.

Many people are wondering if the newly passed government programs created to help stop those falling into foreclosure is helping. Despite all the effort the government has been putting into new bills and laws to help stop the foreclosure nightmare, it just does not have a chance against all the default loans. It is like sending trying to stop a freight train with one box car. The laws that are being created are taking time to create and are only helping a few home owners. They have no chance stopping the foreclosure momentum.

Even more disturbing is the fact that over 360 billion dollars worth of mortgages with adjustable interest rates is going to reset in 2008. This is only going to increase the number of foreclosures across the nation.

So what can you do if you live in Las Vegas, Stockton California, Detroit, or any other area and you are starting to loose your house to foreclosure. There is a simple and easy answer, sell your house. Now you might say, easier said than done right? Well it is in fact that easy. Even though there are not many home buyers looking for houses you still can sell your house.

The best way to sell your house if you are falling behind on payments or see the foreclosure monster coming your way is to contact a local professional home buyer. You see, there are many ways to sell houses and professional home buyers make a living from helping people sell their house, at no cost to you I might add.

Even if you owe more for your house than what it is worth, you can sell your house. Local home buyers will work with the banks to release the loans against your home and they will buy it from you, all this at no out of pocket expense. The problem is many people do not realize that professional home buyers exist, they think the only way to sell a house is through a realtor or for sale by owner, not true.

So, if you need to sell your house to stop foreclosure contact your local home buyer and receive a free offer on your house today. If you contact them today you could have an offer on your house within 48 hours. They can explain to you your home selling options and possible solutions. Then you just choose the right one for your situation.


Hundreds of Renters Being Evicted by Banks and Real Estate Investors Still Profiting

April 16, 2008

Now that the foreclosure epidemic is in full swing, it is not just home owners who are getting slapped in the face. Hundreds of tenants renting homes across the nation are being evicted and forced to move with little or short notice from the banks.

The renters have no idea the homes they are living in are in preforeclosure status and are scheduled to soon be sold at public auction. The renters only find out when they come home to a notice posted on the front door stating they have 30 days to move or be forced to leave the house.

It all started when investors purchased houses as investments speculating they would go up in the near future. They purchased high end homes with larger price tags so they could make more money in a shorter amount of time. After all when housing prices go up by 10% you are much better off to having a $500,000 house than a $100,000 house.

Now many of those so called easy money real estate investments are falling into foreclosure and the banks are the ones evicting the tenants. Many tenants are in long term lease agreements and have been paying their bills on time for months. They also put down large sums of money as a rental deposit for the home they have been living in.

“I see this scenario on a weekly basis. Once the home owner or investor knows they can not afford the mortgage they keep collecting the rent checks but dont pay the mortgage and pocket the money”. Shaun Greer (Founder of ExpertHomeOffers.com a national internet company that connects motivated sellers with local real estate home buyers).

So the questions is,
Do you think the real estate investors or land lords are responsible for loss damages paid to the renter? After all moving your family in less than 30 days can be very hectic and these renters are also out their deposit.