Falling Houseing Prices Continue to Rule The Economic World

August 6, 2008

When will the falling house prices finally plateau? This question is on the lips of a number of real estate market analysts and investors who are looking for the promised turnaround in a housing sector that continues to disappoint. Although regulations are becoming more stringent in the lending market and the real estate sector has seen some overall positive trends, the big factors of foreclosures and a reticent buyer attitude has continued to make property prices fall.

Some home analysts are wondering where the bottom prices are. For millions of American homeowners, the same question is being analyzed. With a stalled real estate market, homeowners are sitting tight, waiting for the storm of failing prices to past. While they wait, their home equity is slowly sliding by and the value of their home dips more and more. Many potential home buyers have decided to wait on the sidelines rather than risk selling their home for too little of a profit. And for those individuals who are in the market for their first homes, the unsteady market has played a role for these non-homeowners as well. The ability to secure a mortgage, and establish a good rate, has proven to be trickier as the market continues to spiral downward.

Last week, the National Association of Realtors stated that the median price of homes decreased 6.1% compared to a year ago. Sales from the previous month had also fallen 2.6%, which was a higher percentage than had been previously estimated by experts.

What hope lies on the horizon for home buyers and sellers alike? Fortunately, there are major housing packages that are currently in Congress that can help to turn the situation around. A beneficial package was passed by the House last week that would boost the market by assisting first-time home buyers.

However, analysts state that there are a number of factors that could make the housing market go up or continue to fall in the future. One of these factors is foreclosures. The increased wave of foreclosures has given banks a higher inventory of these properties. In turn, the banks have become eager sellers, wanting to get their foreclosed properties off the books as quickly as possible before prices fall again. However, the surplus of motivated sellers and a stale feeling coming from the potential buyers has locked a number of potential sales. As long as the lock continues, the prices on the properties themselves continue to drop down.

Rising energy and fuel costs coupled with poor mortgage situations have been to blame for the rise in foreclosures. However, so long as this trend continues, the drop in prices will follow suit. In addition, there is the question of over-saturation. During the real estate boom years, new housing developments sprang up quickly and were bought even faster. With the halt in the housing market, however, these projects are now additional surplus with reluctant buyers, leaving these homes vacant or worse, unfinished. As long as these trends continue, the prices in properties will continue to drop until more positive steps are taken.

If you are thinking how can I sell my house fast to get out from under this large mortgage, contact your local we buy houses professional. They existing in every major metro area and will give you an offer for your home. Their service is free and there is no obligation for you to accept their offer.


Harvard To Study The Real Estate Market – When Will It Be Easy To Sell My House

July 7, 2008

The fact that the real estate industry is at a low point right now is not a secret. However, even Harvard has taken on the real estate market to analyze what is currently influencing and affecting the industry.

Home prices and sales in the real estate market have plummeted. In addition, foreclosure statistics are increasing dramatically and rates to secure a new mortgage are rising. With the housing market looking so bleak, Harvard studies decided to see what factors impact future housing decisions. Most importantly, these Harvard studies want to see when the real estate market will improve as the industry has a strong impact on the overall economy.

The current real estate market has many home owners wondering, how can I sell my house, where are all the home buyers. When the real estate market takes a turn for the worst hundreds of thousands of home owners are stuck with a home they either can not afford or do not need. For this reason Harvard has decided to study the real estate market and decipher, what will bring the real estate market back to life.

According to the latest study from the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, the future is looking bright. The country is set to improve in the real estate sector in the next decade. Specifically, the demand for housing will help to offset the current problems in the industry.

The best news for the housing market is that the United States is growing. With an increase in population, the need for places to live will grow exponentially, helping to drive the need for more houses. In addition, there are a variety of social trends that will help fuel future housing increases. People are getting married later in life and getting divorced more and more frequently, making the number of single person households increase. In addition, there is a higher life expectancy for baby boomers and echo boomers.

Finally, immigration will play a large role in the increase in housing demand with an annual projection of 1.2 million each year. In other words, from 2010 to 2020, the number of households needing a home will increase on average by more than 1.4 million each year.

This increase in housing demand will play a critical role in improving the current real estate market. Once the effects of subprime mortgage rates and other housing impacts become steady again, the real estate market will see an increase in the industry due to these social factors and immigration.

However, before the good times in the real estate sector can begin, the number of unsold homes must decrease. The number of vacant homes currently available for sale rose 46 percent to a total of 2.12 million homes from 2005 to 2007. These vacant homes have terrorized the existing real estate market, lowering prices and halting new construction. As of earlier this year, there was an 11 month supply of unsold new homes.

If you need to sell your vacant home I suggest contacting your local home buyer in your area. Local home buyers are professional real estate investors who purchase houses quickly for cash. This service helps you sell your house quick so you can move on with your life. Besides, a vacant house could be a great home for another loving family.

To compare, a six month supply is considered a buyers market and the 11 month statistic shows the deep increase in unsold homes currently on the market. With a reduction in supply, prices will again rise, interest rates will go down, employment will increase from construction and other related industries and consumer confidence will once again climb.

The factors that impact the real estate market are set to change our current dip. All we need now is time to bring about the social changes and immigration in order to see the housing market back on its feet again. When this happens home owners will have a better change to sell their house fast for the price they need. Until then, if you are thinking how can I sell my house myself for a fair price, contact your local home buyer.


Foreclosure Prevention Act 2008 – Stop Foreclosure Fast Help

May 6, 2008

The government is doing all they can to stop the slowing of the economy. On February 13th 2008 the Foreclosure Act of 2008 was introduced to congress. Heading up the bill is Senator Harry Reid, a democrat in Nevada. You should not be surprised that Nevada holds the record for the highest foreclosure rate since the real estate market peak in summer of 2005. Along with the senator from Nevada there are 25 cosponsors of the bill all of which are democrats or independents.

Highlights of the Proposed Bill:
The law will increasing preforeclosure counseling funding by and additional 200 million dollars. It is estimated this additional funding would help more than 500,000 additional families connect with their lenders and work out a solution to stop the foreclosure process.

If passed the bill would allow housing finance companies to use proceeds from mortgage revenue bonds to refinance short term and adjustable rate mortgages. This will provide an additional 10 billion dollars of tax exempt money for refinancing first time home buyers houses and multiple tenant rental properties.

The bill could help over 600,000 people stop the foreclosure process by allowing them to file for bankruptcy, then the bankruptcy judge has the option to modify the home owners loan. Only nontraditional and sub prime mortgages would be considered for this loan modification process. Home owners would also need to prove they can not repay the mortgage and it would only primary residential homes would be considered.

Other items on the proposed bill include 4 billion in funding for communities with high rates of foreclosure. The communities or cities would buy vacant houses that are in foreclosure, fix them up and rent them or sell them. The law also proposes making mortgage documents more clear at the closing table.

The likelihood of this bill helping people falling into foreclosure in 2008 is not likely. The process for a bill to be passed into law is time consuming and filled with political setbacks. This does not mean the foreclosure prevention act of 2008 will not help stop foreclosure for many home owners, it just means the people in foreclosure right now or in the near future are not likely to see relief from this bill.

The proposed foreclosure prevention bill still has a long way to go until it becomes law. It was introduced in February, next it will be voted on by the Senate, then voted on by the House, then considered by Mr. president himself. Only after the president accepts the bill does it become law. This is another interested thing about this bill. It is being proposed and supported by democrats, so the question is will our current Republican president accept a bill proposed by all democrats?